Best and Worst Reads of 2010

It’s a new year, so I again need to sum up my reading experience of the past year. In 2010, I read 54 full length works. Included in the count are novels, short story collections, non-fiction books, plays, and screenplays.

Although I have included them in the count, some books are texts that I have read before. I have not considered them for my best and worst list since they are already among my favorites and have been numbered on lists past.
Here are my lists. I present them with no justification. If you would like to argue for or against any of them, please feel free to do so in the comments section. I doubt this will happen, of course, but the option remains open.
Five Best Fiction Books:
1. Ethan Frome–Edith Wharton
2. Long After Dark–Todd Robert Petersen
3. Mrs. Dalloway–Virginia Woolf
4. Tinkers–Paul Harding
5. Song of Solomon–Toni Morrison
Five Best Non-Fiction Books:
1. Blue Latitudes–Tony Horwitz
2. The Joseph Smith Papers: Journals, Vol. 1, 1832-1839
3. Evolution: The Remarkable History of a Scientific Theory–Edward J. Larson
4. A Short History of Nearly Everything–Bill Bryson
5. Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood–Douglas Thayer
Five Worst Books:
1. March–Geraldine Brooks
2. Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter–Seth Grahame-Smith
3. Breaking Dawn–Stephenie Meyer
4. The Guinea Pig Diaries–A. J. Jacobs
5. Of Mice and Men–John Steinbeck
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2 thoughts on “Best and Worst Reads of 2010”

  1. I'm so glad you, an admired literary educator, included Of Mice and Men on your Five Worst Books list! Ugh. I haven't read it since it was required in high school.

    And out of curiosity, who is the hooligan in Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood?

  2. The Hooligan would be Douglas Thayer, the author of the book. It's a memoir of his childhood in Provo during the Great Depression and World War II.

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